Chapter 4 - Writing

How to Tell the Story

We already talked about how to find stories for Infographic content, but that’s only half the battle. You also need to knowhow to tell the stories through Infographic content.

Infographics tell a story by answering a question, solving a problem, and/or explaining a topic. So they must have a clear message, beginning, and end. They must have natural transitions and flow, just like a written piece of content.

When writing content for an infogrpahic, imagine that you are going to present the information to a group. During a presentation, you would not simply read off data points or facts. You would instead explain the relationships, observations, and implications of the information. Do the same with your infographic content.

Look at these two versions of the same infographic. One shares information only, while the other tells a clear story.

Version One: Without a Story

Why You Should Adapt to Mobile Marketing (Or Risk Becoming a Dinosaur)

  • By the end of 2012, 1 billion people owned smartphones. That number will double to 2 billion by 2015.
  • 84 percent of shoppers use their smartphones to research consumer goods while in the store.
  • 25 percent of Internet traffic currently comes from mobile devices.

By 2015, more people in the U.S. will use mobile devices than desktops for local searches.

(Chart)

  • Year    Desktop/Mobile
  • 2011    54.9b/19.7b
  • 2012    61.6b/30.7b
  • 2013    69.2b/46.0b
  • 2014    77.1b/63.7b
  • 2015    84.0b/85.9b
  • 2016    85.6b/113.4b

77 percent of mobile searches happen at work or home; 17 percent are done on the go. People use mobile devices even when computers are nearby.

55 percent of mobile searches convert to some kind of action such as visiting a store, making a phone call, or purchasing an item.

People searching the Web with mobile devices are:

  • 30 percent more likely to visit the retailer’s website
  • 57 percent more likely to visit a store
  • 51 percent more likely to make a purchase
  • 39 percent more like to call a business

Click-to-call ads from Google lets smartphone users contact businesses just by clicking an ad.

  • Make campaign management easier
  • Make pay-per-click ads smarter
  • Introduce an advertising conversion based on call duration

Version Two: With a Story

New content is underlined.

Why You Should Adapt to Mobile Marketing (Or Risk Becoming a Dinosaur)

Think you don’t need to adapt to mobile marketing to survive? Think again.

Mobile Devices Are Becoming More Popular Every Year

  • By the end of 2012, 1 billion people owned smartphones. That number will double to 2 billion by 2015.
  • 84 percent of shoppers use their smartphones to research consumer goods while in the store.
  • 25 percent of Internet traffic currently comes from mobile devices.

Mobile Search Will Overtake Desktop Search 

By 2015, more people in the U.S. will use mobile devices than desktops for local searches.

(Chart)

  • Year    Desktop/Mobile
  • 2011    54.9b/19.7b
  • 2012    61.6b/30.7b
  • 2013    69.2b/46.0b
  • 2014    77.1b/63.7b
  • 2015    84.0b/85.9b
  • 2016    85.6b/113.4b

77 percent of mobile searches happen at work or home; 17 percent are done on the go. People use mobile devices even when computers are nearby.

Mobile Is Becoming the Top of the Sales Funnel

55 percent of mobile searches convert to some kind of action such as visiting a store, making a phone call, or purchasing an item.

People searching the Web with mobile devices are:

  • 30 percent more likely to visit the retailer’s website
  • 57 percent more likely to visit a store
  • 51 percent more likely to make a purchase
  • 39 percent more likely to call a business

Mobile Is Still Evolving – For the Better

Click-to-call ads from Google let smartphone users contact businesses just by clicking an ad.

Google has plans to make mobile marketing even better:

  • Make campaign management easier
  • Make pay-per-click ads smarter
  • Introduce an advertising conversion based on call duration

Adapt to the evolution of marketing, and embrace mobile marketing before you end up as just another fossil.

Conclusion

You can see how the new text ties the story together and gives the data a bigger, more obvious meaning.

Only six lines were added to Version Two in order to tell the story. As you can see, telling a story doesn’t mean adding lengthy text. It means adding:

  • a clear introduction and conclusion
  • subheadings and/or cues that lead the reader
  • a unifying theme
  • a complete message
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